3 Steps To Hurricane Preparedness

via Ready.gov

Hurricanes are severe tropical storms that form in the southern Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico and in the eastern Pacific Ocean.  People who live in hurricane prone communities should know their vulnerability, and what actions should be taken to reduce the effects of these devastating storms. There are obvious things that you can do, for example, requesting the assistance of a locksmith in order to install reinforced locks and additional bolts to the doors and windows of the house in order to make them be able to better withstand the strong winds and perhaps even debris that could be pushing in from the outside. Said doors and windows should also be reinforced themselves as well.

The information on this page can be used to save lives at work, home, while on the road, or on the water.

  • Steps you can take to protect your family, property or business
  • Recommended Training
  • Additional Resources

Step 1: Build A Kit / “To-Go Bag”

Get an Emergency Supply Kit, which includes items like non-perishable food, water, a battery-powered or hand-crank radio, extra flashlights and batteries. You may want to prepare a portable kit and keep it in your car in case you are told to evacuate.

Step 2: Make a Plan

Prepare your family
Make a Family Emergency Plan. Your family may not be together when disaster strikes, so it is important to know how you will contact one another, how you will get back together and what you will do in case of an emergency. You should also consider:

  • Evacuation plans
  • Family communications
  • Utility shut-off and safety
  • Safety skills

Prepare Your Business
Businesses have a critical role in preparedness. Putting a disaster plan in motion now will improve the likelihood that your company will survive and recover.  Ready Business outlines commonsense measures business owners and managers can take to start getting ready.

Plan to Protect Property
Hurricanes cause heavy rains that can cause extensive flood damage in coastal and inland areas. Therefore, house renovations annerley can help you lifting your home to prevent any damage. Everyone is at risk and should consider flood insurance protection, as well as water damage restoration if needed. Flood insurance is the only way to financially protect your property or business from flood damage.

To learn more about your flooding risk and how to protect yourself and your business, visit the NFIP Web site, www.floodsmart.gov or call 1-800-427-2419. You should also have company names and numbers that you might need on hand such as a 24/7 water damage restoration company.

For more detailed information on how you can protect your property, view the Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration’s printer-friendly handout Avoiding Hurricane Damage

In addition to insurance, you can also:

  • Cover all of your home’s windows with pre-cut ply wood or hurricane shutters to protect your windows from high winds.
  • Plan to bring in all outdoor furniture, decorations, garbage cans and anything else that is not tied down.
  • Keep all trees and shrubs well trimmed so they are more wind resistant.
  • Secure your home by closing shutters, and securing outdoor objects or bringing them inside.
  • Turn off utilities as instructed. Otherwise, turn the refrigerator thermostat to its coldest setting and keep its doors closed.
  • Turn off propane tank installation switches.
  • Install a generator for emergencies
  • Reinforce your garage doors by using the commercial door installation to keep them safe; if wind enters a garage, it can cause dangerous and expensive structural damage.
  • Ensure a supply of water for sanitary purposes such as cleaning and flushing toilets. Fill the bathtub and other large containers with water.
  • Find out how to keep food safe during and after and emergency by visiting www.FoodSafety.gov.

Step 3: Be Informed

Hurricane hazards come in many forms: lightning, tornadoes, flooding, storm surge, high winds, even landslides or mudslides can be triggered in mountainous regions.  Look carefully at the safety actions associated with each type of hurricane hazard and prepare your family disaster plan accordingly. But remember this is only a guide. The first and most important thing anyone should do when facing a hurricane threat is to use common sense.

  • Learn about damaging and potentially deadly hurricane hazards
  • What to do during a hurricane
  • Get your children involved (kids site)
  • People with Disabilities and Other Access and Functional Needs
  • Care for pets

Familiarize yourself with the terms that are used to identify a hurricane.

  • A hurricane watch means a hurricane is possible in your area. Be prepared to evacuate and install a evac chair to help your family get out in time. Monitor local radio and television news outlets or listen to NOAA Weather Radio for the latest developments.
  • A hurricane warning is when a hurricane is expected in your area. If local authorities advise you to evacuate, leave immediately.

Hurricanes are classified into five categories based on their wind speed, central pressure, and damage potential. Category Three and higher hurricanes are considered major hurricanes, though Categories One and Two are still extremely dangerous and warrant your full attention and prevention with state of the art home gadgets like the wayne wss30v sump pump.

Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale

Scale Number (Category) Sustained Winds (MPH) Damage Storm Surge
1 74-95 Minimal: Unanchored mobile homes, vegetation and signs. 4-5 feet
2 96-110 Moderate: All mobile homes, roofs, small crafts, flooding. 6-8 feet
3 111-130 Extensive: Small buildings, low-lying roads cut off. 9-12 feet
4 131-155 Extreme: Roofs destroyed, trees down, roads cut off, mobile homes destroyed. Beach homes flooded. 13-18 feet
5 More than 155 Catastrophic: Most buildings destroyed. Vegetation destroyed. Major roads cut off. Homes flooded. Greater than 18 feet

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